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The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights

The Nation's Premier Civil and Human Rights Coalition

The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights  & The Leadership Conference Education Fund
The Nation's Premier Civil and Human Rights Coalition

2010 Census: Fact Sheets

Why the Census Is Important to Your Family and Community

Asian American and Pacific Islander Families and the 2010 Census (PDF)

The 2010 census will influence the health and well-being of Asian-American and Pacific Islander families and the political power of their communities for the next 10 years.

African American Families and the 2010 Census (PDF)

The 2010 census will influence the education of African-American children, the health of families, and the economic and political power of African-American communities for the next 10 years and beyond.

The 2010 Census Is Important for Young Children and the People Who Love Them (PDF)

Being counted in the 2010 census is important to the future of every baby and preschooler. Information gathered in the census is used to help distribute more than $400 billion every year in federal funding, and much of that money goes to programs that help children and their families.

Latino Families and the 2010 Census (PDF)

The 2010 census will influence the education of Latino children, the health of Latino families, and the political power of Latino communities for the next 10 years.

The Census and Native Americans (PDF)

The 2010 census will influence the health and well-being of Native American families and the political power of their communities.

The Census and People with Disabilities (Download PDF)

People with disabilities have a lot at stake in the census; individuals with disabilities are significantly more likely to live in poverty than the rest of the population and many rely on programs whose funding is directly or indirectly allocated based on census data.

The Census and Women (PDF)

The 2010 census will influence the health, well-being and political influence of American women, their families and their communities for the next 10 years.

The Importance of the Census to Immigrant Communities (PDF)

Every 10 years the Census Bureau counts everyone living in the United States, no matter what their legal or immigration status.

Census Operations: Help Ensure that Everyone Is Counted!

Alternative Census Forms and the American Community Survey (PDF)

College Students and the 2010 Census (PDF)

An accurate census of colleges and universities also helps the communities where campuses are located receive their fair share of federal program funds for maintaining roads and public transit, hiring police officers, and other important social services.

How to Count Kids 0-5 in the Census (PDF)

The 2010 Census and People Living in Non-traditional Housing: Group Homes, Shelters, Transitory Housing, and the Homeless (PDF)

The Census Bureau has designed ways to count people who don't live in traditional homes, like houses or apartments.

Promoting Census Participation: Nuts and Bolts

Race and Ethnicity in the 2010 Census (PDF)

The census form that every household in America will receive in February or March 2010 includes questions about each person‟s race and whether or not a person identifies as "Hispanic, Latino or of Spanish origin". These questions are included because information on race and ethnicity is required by federal law and is important to evaluating the effectiveness of federal programs and civil rights protections.

 Confidentiality and Privacy (Download PDF)

Census answers cannot be used against you in any way. Answering the 2010 census questionnaire is a simple way to do a lot of good for your community.

Guidelines for Community-Based Group Volunteers Promoting the Census (PDF)

Community-based organizations can make a huge and long-lasting contribution to the communities they serve by helping to make sure that everyone is counted in the 2010 census.