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The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights

The Nation's Premier Civil and Human Rights Coalition

The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights  & The Leadership Conference Education Fund
The Nation's Premier Civil and Human Rights Coalition

Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA)

The Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) would prohibit employment discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. There is currently no federal law protecting individuals from job discrimination based on actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity. This means that at any time, someone can be discriminated against, fired or not hired simply because he/she is or is perceived to be gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender.

ENDA is modeled on the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, religion, gender, national origin, and color. ENDA works within the boundaries of the Civil Rights Act to protect a group of people who have been historically and are currently discriminated against.

Currently, several states offer protection based on sexual orientation and gender identity. ENDA would ensure this type of protection across the entire country to all citizens of the United States.

ENDA Resources

Reports

  • The State of the Workplace - Human Rights Campaign Foundation - 2/12/2009 - This annual report is a national source of information on laws and policies surrounding sexual orientation and gender identity in the workplace.
  • Working in the Shadows: Ending Employment Discrimination for LGBT Americans - ACLU - 9/17/07 - This ACLU-issued report urges Congress to pass ENDA, and uses the stories of workers from across the country who have experienced workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity to make the case for passage of the bill.

Employment Non-Discrimination Act of 2007

Employment Non-Discrimination Act of 2001

ENDA in the 1990s

ENDA was first introduced in the 103rd Congress on June 23, 1994. Six days later on July 29, the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee held the first congressional hearing ever to consider civil rights protections against sexual orientation. It has been reintroduced to the 104th, 105th and 106th Congresses and has been gaining bipartisan support every time.

Our Members